Stage 1 (Novice): Around the World in 80 Days, chapter 2

CHAPTER 2: THE WIDOW AND THE DETECTIVE

As they began their journey into the deep woods of India, they met countless native Indian tribes called “Hindoos”. They were highly aggressive(1) and should be avoided at all time. As night began to fall, they decided to stop and camp but not much later, they caught glimpses of a group of Indians who were going to burn a woman as tribune to their Gods because her husband had died. They hoped that by doing this, they would make the Gods become happy and not bring disaster onto their land.The Englishmen became horrified.

Mr.Fogg, though he had little time to spare, decided he could not stand by. Passepartout could perceive (2) that Fogg was a caring man inspire of his icy and seemingly heartless appearance. Phillips Fogg had a team of enthusiastic allies who were ready for anything.

Admired for her beauty, the distressed (3) widow was the daughter of a talented and prosperous merchant, married against her own will. The Englishmen patiently waited for nightfall, which would give them the chance they needed to rescue the woman. The plan was bold and daring: they were going to wait for all the guards to fall asleep. But this never happened, so they chose to wait the night out, until an idea suddenly hit Passepartout. He would disguise himself as the deceased (4) husband and thus trick the guards. The plan worked out brilliantly, and they escaped with the beautiful widow.

Making their way to the train station with hardly any spare time left, Phillis Fogg, Passepartout and the rescued widow – Auoda was her name,  boarded a train to Calcutta and a steamer to Hong Kong. Gouda soon became very much a part of the group, as she could speak English fluently, having been schooled in a British boarding school. Her mind was logical and sound, not filled with silly superstitions (5).

The voyage to Hong Kong was surprisingly pleasant. Aouda got to know Fogg better and was extremely grateful for what he did for her.

Joining them on board however, was another mysterious person – he was disguised, and no one knew he was following Mr.Fogg. It was none other than the detective, Mr.Fix, who still believed that Mr.Fogg was a criminal. He was determined to find evidence supporting Mr.Fogg’s guilt.

The steamer arrived in Hong Kong and would not leave until the following day.

As Passepartout wandered around the town that day, he was amazed at its resemblance (8) to British ones. By chance, he met Detective Fix on the streets, who revealed to him his true identity.

“ I am Detective Fix. I believe that your master, Mr.Fogg, is a criminal trying to escape punishment. Do you know if he has done anything wrong?”

Passepartout was surprised. He thought the Detective was very silly, and right away said that his master was the most honest man in the world.

As he said this, Passepartout received an announcement saying that the ship scheduled to leave the following day would in fact leave that very night. Detective Fix was desperate. He could not let his chance slip like that, and sneakily gave Passepartout a drugged pipe which made him fall asleep.

Meanwhile, Mr.Fogg spent the night at a hotel without his servant. Waking up the next morning, he was shocked to find that the ship was gone. Passepartout was also nowhere to be found. He accidentally met Detective Fix however, who told him that he will have to wait for one week for another steamer to come. Seeing Mr.Fogg’s urgent (10) need for a ship however, a sailor nearby offered to take them to Shanghai. From there, they could board a steamer to Yokahoma, Japan.

Once again, without hesitating, Fogg accepted the offer and went looking for Passepartout. Unable to find him anywhere, he left the local authorities some money to find him and decided to leave without his servant. Not all was lost, however, for Mr.Fogg made it to Shanghai in time for his steamer. Detective Fix was, of course, still with him.

Glosasry

•Cortege: a moving group of people at a funeral

•Perceive: come to understand

•Distressed: suffering

•Deceased: no longer living

•Superstition: the belief in supernatural events and happenings

•Glance: a brief look

•Bail: to offer some form of wealth to be release from prison

•Resemblance: the state of being alike

•Slip: to move with a sliding motion

• Urgent: requiring immediate action or attention

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